Author Topic: Brewery and Tad pubs.  (Read 5094 times)  Share 

Offline bitterboy

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Brewery and Tad pubs.
« on: Jul 21 - 2014 »
A bit of history but dates differ from various sources?,so apologies if dates don't tally completely.
"The Old Brewery, which is just behind the Angel and White Horse, was Beaumont's in 1758 (and it was nearly a century old then) when it was purchased by the Hartley family.  John Smith bought it in the 1850s, and on his death his son William built the new brewery, which kept the name John Smith'.(earliest mention of Beaumonts I can find is 1728,"they had a brewery in Tadcaster which they later sold to the Hartley family").

A little bit more history.In 1758 the  brewery was owned by Stephen Hartley,Jane Hartley mortgaged the brewery to David Backhouse and John Hartley.It was the run down brewery that John Smith took over from Hartleys Widow Jane.

Trade directories for 1798 show W Backhouse proprietor of the White Horse and in conjunction with John Hartley,postmaster ran a coaching business,also listed as brewers.
1845 records show Jane Hartley,brewer owned the Golden Lion,George and Dragon and Black Bull,all in Tadcaster.

In the Yorkshire Gazette 8th Feb 1845 it states,"friends may be conferred on her successors,Messrs Backhouse and Hartley,by whom she feels confident the business will be continued in a way that will give complete satisfaction.Messrs Backhouse and Hartley hope to merit the above recommendation".
John died and his sons Samuel and William took over,William bought out Samuel and built a new brewery in 1883 leaving Samuel with the old brewery.
I guess the brewery was without much equipment,in various papers from 1887,this from Yorkshire Post 14th May 1887 states"The old brewery reopened,Samuel Smiths,the old brewery Tadcaster,celebrated ales and stouts,agents wanted,willfully beg to inform trade and private customers that our ales are from barley,malt and hops only".

At the time Lord Londesborough (hence Londesborough hotel)was lord of the manor and owned most of Tadcaster and land all over,he lived at Grimston Park,previously owned by lord Howden(hence Howden Arms).In 1873 Lord Londesborough sold a lot of his estate and much of it was bought by John Smith before he died,including;

Malt Shovel,described as " public house,stable,cow house and yard in the occupation of Thomas Hoggett".(closed1960s)

Londesborough Hotel,described as "hall,sitting room,kitchen,back kitchen,scullery.first floor,sitting room,7 bedrooms,wc.second floor,6 bedrooms and lumber room.Outside is a barn,ten stables,coachouses,saddle room granary and farm premises,yards and sheds.bought by John Smith for ?2450.(brewery offices)

George and Dragon,High Street(now Tykes tearooms)Hull Daily Mail 12 Feb 1907 mentions Samuel Smith of Tadcaster transferring the license.
(Not found out where to yet)

Fox and Hounds(ladypitts),Leeds Rd,still Sams

Coach and Horses,Commercial St(now a theakstones pub)

Britannia Inn,described as stables,cow house and shed,cottage and warehouse.Next door was a house,butchers shop and slaughter yard,(where tadkebab is now)bought by J Smith for ?900.

Black Bull,Kirkgate.now demolished.

Bay Horse,described as Inn with barn,stable and orchard,still Sams

Howden Arms,still Sams

All the pubs were retained by Samuel and the old brewery when the new johns brewery was built,with the exception of Coach which was joined by shops etc to Britannia before bus station was built many years ago.
SAMs also had the Railway Hotel,Kirkgate, which was a Braimes pub(Braimes brewery was where central car park is now)they used to run a coach to the Wheatsheaf Inn at Bolton Percy to pick up passengers and mail for Tadcaster before the Church Fenton to Harrogate line was built.In the landlord was one William Shilleto,family ran pubs in Tadcaster,interesting that Wheatsheaf is now Station Farm owned by Sams.
Yorkshire Gazette 18 May 1839 states "York and North Midland Railway ,Messrs Backhouse and Hartley of Tadcaster intend running an omnibus between Tadcaster and Bolton Percy".

Will post more if of interest.BB




Offline canaldrifter

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Re: Brewery and Tad pubs.
« Reply #1 on: Jul 21 - 2014 »
Good digging BB. I'd be interested if you find any Quaker connections with early breweries. Although they tend to be TT nowadays, originally the Quakers did start breweries in parts of the country.

Tone

Offline bitterboy

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Re: Brewery and Tad pubs.
« Reply #2 on: Jul 21 - 2014 »
I know there was a Quaker burial ground in Oxton lane which was used in the 17th century,about 100 people are buried there,records are held at the Borthwick Institute,York.

Offline Malchetone

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Re: Brewery and Tad pubs.
« Reply #3 on: Jul 21 - 2014 »
I know there was a Quaker burial ground in Oxton lane which was used in the 17th century,about 100 people are buried there,records are held at the Borthwick Institute,York.
The Quaker Burial ground is where the small paved garden is opposite the entrance to the Grange Estate.

Offline Malchetone

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Re: Brewery and Tad pubs.
« Reply #4 on: Jul 21 - 2014 »
Here's a list of Tadcaster pubs that I compiled from various sources about 10 years ago which may be of use. It's still a work in progress, but hasn't been touched for donkey's years and is consequently out of date on recent changes. The intention was / is to eventually flesh it out from all census / trade directories / newspaper articles that I can find.

The list starts at the east end of Tadcaster, progresses to the west, and then fills in the town centre area.


 Slip Inn
?   Near tollbar on A64 York Road.
?   Closed.

Leeds Arms
?   John Smiths pub on North side of York Road.
?   Known as the Drovers Arms when John Smith acquired it in 1880.
?   Previously in line with the other property in York Road, it was rebuilt in it's 'set back' position in the 1930s.
 
Travelling Man
?   John Smiths pub on South side of York Road almost opposite Leeds Arms.
?   John Smith bought the pub from Joseph Grimston in 1896.
?   Thought to be a unique pub name.
?   Closed in 1968 and demolished shortly after.
?   Site now occupied by a number of terraced houses.
?   The licence was transferred to the Jackdaw.

Royal Oak
?   Sam Smiths pub on East side of Wighill Lane.
?   The last tenanted Sam Smiths pub in Tadcaster, when Joe Knowles retired, it became managed like all the others.
?   Was known as the Old Royal Oak in the latter nineteenth century.
?   A mid 1970s refurbishment resulted in an adjacent cottage being incorporated into the pub.
 
Boot and Shoe
?   On East side of Wighill Lane.
?   Closed after 1936, and now largely demolished.
?   Public footpath runs through the remains.
 
Rose and Crown
?   On the South side of Commercial Street at the junction with Oxton Lane.
?   One of the 3 main coaching inns.
?   Part of Lord Londesborough's estate in the 1873 auction.
?   Became a private house and then, in 1914, Shilleto's Butchers.
?   It was demolished in the early 1970s when the area was re-developed.
 
Elephant and Castle
?   On the North side of Commercial Street at the junction with Wighill Lane.
?   Became Dearlove's Grocery shop
?   It was demolished in the early 1970s when the area was re-developed.
 
Bay Horse
?   Sam Smiths pub on North side of Commercial Street at junction with Mill Lane.
?   Natural stonework was revealed when white rendering was removed in mid 1990s refurbishment.
?   There's a mounting stone at the front of the pub.

Coach and Horses
?   John Smiths pub on South side of Commercial Street at entrance to Crab Garth.
?   Refurbished and extended in mid 1990s.

Britannia
?   Sam Smiths pub on South side of Commercial Street at entrance to Crab Garth and next to river bridge.
?   Originally built as a private house in the early 1900s, but became a pub by 1907.
?   Named after a sand barge that used to be moored near by.
?   For a short time in the late 1980s it was known as the Brown Trout following an extension / refurbishment which resulted in 2 adjacent cottages being incorporated into the pub. Public opinion deemed that it should revert to the Britannia.
?   The late 1980s refurbishment also resulted in the rendering being removed to reveal the natural stone

Angel
?   Described in Pigot's 1834 directory and White's 1837 directory as being 'East side of Bridge' .
?   In 1834 the landlord was Thomas England.
?   In 1837 the landlord was Bernard Selby.
?   Closed.

Anchor
?   South side of Bridge Street at junction with Wharfebank Terrace.
?   Building now occupied by Bartle and Sons Estate Agents.

Golden Lion
?   John Smiths pub on South side of Bridge Street.
?   Part of Lord Londesborough's estate in the 1873 auction.
?   Closed in early 1970s.
?   Shortly after closure Sam Smiths bought it to house their architects department, now used as a Citizens Advice Bureau.
?   Heavy baggage wagons known as 'slow coaches' used the Golden Lion
?   The Golden Lion yard is still in existence.

White Swan
?   John Smiths pub on North side of Bridge Street.
?   When John Smiths recommenced brewing cask beer in the mid 1980s, the White Swan was supposed to be the first place to serve it. However, it missed out on this distinction because following a recent refurbishment, it was found that there wasn't enough headroom on the gantry to accommodate the casks.
?   Jos . Middleton, a former White Swan landlord, lived under the reign of 5 monarchs: George III, George IV, William IV, Victoria, Edward VII.

White Hart
?   John Smiths pub on North side of Bridge Street.
?   Is now a dentists.
?   Still trading in 1929 it was probably closed by 1935 .
?   The green tiled frontage remains from it's days as a pub.

Red Hart
?   Probably on the South side of Bridge Street.
?   Described in Pigot's 1834 directory and White's 1837 directory as being in Bridge Street.
?   Landlord was William Coates.
?   Closed.

Angel and White Horse
?   Sam Smiths pub on South side of High Street opposite junction with Kirkgate.
?   One of the 3 main coaching inns.
?   Part of Lord Londesborough's estate in the 1873 auction.
?   Formerly known as the Red Hart in Tudor times according to Tadcaster Historical Society publications.
?   Later became known as the Angel (before 1822).
?   Closed in 1855, and became shops.
?   A number of Sam Smiths white Shires are normally stabled in the pub yard.
?   Opened in 1978 as a replacement for the Londesborough Hotel.
?   Part of the building was formerly a coaching inn known as the Angel.

Londesborough
?   Sam Smiths pub on South side of High Street.
?   One of the 3 main coaching inns.
?   Part of Lord Londesboroughs estate in the 1873 auction.
?   Formerly known as the White Horse.
?   Closed in 1841, and became shops.
?   Re-opened as Londesborough Hotel in 1855 by Lord Londesborough to accommodate excess guests that were overflowing from Grimston Hall.
?   Closed in 1976 and became part of Sam Smiths offices.
?   The name lives on in the Angel and White Horse next door.

Malt Shovel
?   Sam Smiths pub on East side of New Street.
?   White's 1837 directory lists the landlord as Thomas Hogget.
?   Pigot's 1834 directory lists Thomas Hogget as a beer retailer.
?   Probably originated as a beer retailer following the 1830 'Billy's Beer Bill'.
?   Part of Lord Londesborough's estate in the 1873 auction.
?   Closed in 1959.
?   Building remains, and is now part of Sam Smiths brewery.

Griffin
?   New Street, side unknown.
?   Landlord was Mary Williamson in the 1834 Pigot directory and 1837 White directory.
?   Named as the Griffin by White, but Mary Williamson is described as a beer retailer by Pigot.
?   Probably originated as a beer retailer following the 1830 'Billy's Beer Bill'.
?   Closed.

George and Dragon
?   Building with square arch on North side of High Street.
?   Part of Lord Londesborough's estate in the 1873 auction.
?   The arch was demolished early in the 20th century; but was later restored. It's thought that the demolition may have come about after a drayman decapitated himself whilst driving through it.
?   Was probably trading as a pub as long ago as 1548.
?   Previously known as the George, it became the George and Dragon in 1830.
?   Closed in 1930.
?   Now Claire's Pantry Tea Shop.

The Queen
?   John Smiths pub on South side of High Street next to John Smiths brewery yard.
?   Has also been known as Queen's over the years.
?   It closed temporarily in the early 1980s, we're still waiting for it to re-open.
?   Now used by John Smiths pensioners as meeting place for a few hours each week.

Howden Arms
?   Sam Smiths pub on North side of High Street at the junction with St. Joseph's Street.
?   The pub is opposite the main entrance to John Smiths Brewery.
?   During the early 1990s there was a scheme to take it down, stone by stone, and re-build it on the comer of High Street and Chapel Street. This would enable St. Joseph's Street to be widened. This plan now appears to have been shelved. The white rendering was removed to reveal the natural stone though.

Fox and Hounds
?   Sam Smiths pub on North side of Leeds Road (formally known as Ladypitts) opposite the Leeds Road / London Road junction.
?   Part of Lord Londesborough's estate in the 1873 auction.
?   Probably originated as a beer retailer following the 1830 'Billy's Beer Bill'.

New Bridge Inn
?   On the East side of London Road, on the Tadcas1er side and close to the by-pass bridge.
?   Shown on 1840 Ordnance Survey map.
?   Possibly known as Blue Bell in following years.
?   Closed, the building is still standing and has been residential for a number of years.

Jackdaw
?   John Smiths pub on the West side of Stutton Road.
?   Opened in 1968 to service the new Woodlands Estate.
?   The stone came from the demolition of property in Malt Kiln Square, and the licence was transferred from the Travelling Man.

Forresters
?   On the West side of Chapel Street opposite the entrance to the car park.
?   Known as the Red Lion in White's 1837 directory.
?   1837 Landlord is listed as William Bradley.
?   Pigot's 1834 directory lists Thomas Bradley as a beer retailer in Chapel Street.
?   Probably originated following the 1830 ' Billy's Beer Bill'.
?   Closed, the site is now occupied by a terrace of modem stone houses.

Falcon
?   John Smiths pub on the East side of Chapel Street adjacent to the car park entrance.
?   Green tiled frontage prior to refurbishment.

Crown
?   On the North side of Westgate opposite the junction with Chapel Street.
?   Became a doctor's surgery.
?   Closed.

Calcaria
?   Bass pub on the North side of Westgate.
?   Terrace of3 houses, dated 1850, plus a modem extension.
?   Prior to 1850, the pub was originally in what is now the pub yard.
?   Was known as the Fleece in the 1834 and 1837 directories.
?   Until 1987 it was known as the Old Fleece. It changed it's name following a refurbishment and extension.
?   The only Bass pub in Tadcaster.

Old Falcon
?   On the West side of Kirkgate.
?   The pub incorporated the remains of the Ark.
?   The Liversedge family, Thomas in 1834, and finally Sarah, widow of Alan, ran the pub from at least 1834 (Pigot) until Sarah's death in 1942.
?   This was the last Free House in Tadcaster, depending on whether the Wharfedale actually functioned as a pub.
?   Bought by John Smiths in 1942.
?   Upon closure in 1947, the non Ark portion became a Barbers and the Ark portion became a museum.
?   The Ark portion is now the Council Offices.

Wharfedale
?   East side of Kirkgate.
?   Former Night Club that applied for and got a full on licence in the mid 1980s to enable it to function as a pub.
?   It advertised Tetley beers, but whether it actually opened as a pub is debatable.
?   Closed, since the early 1990s it has been the Mandarin Palace Chinese Restaurant.

Robin Hood
?   East side of Kirkgate opposite the Ark.
?   Closed.
?   The Robin Hood yard is still in existence.

Railway Hotel
?   East side of Kirkgate.
?   Was known as the Bull and Dog until 1837.
?   Used to send a coach to meet every train at Bolton Percy prior to Tadcaster getting it's own railway station in 1848.
?   Godfrey Braime, a landlord who was crushed to death at Church Fenton station on his way back from Market Weighton Agricultural show, has an amusing gravestone in Tadcaster churchyard.
?   In 1908 it became a Barbers House Furnishers shop and then Horton and Hollanders Electrical Shop.
?   Closed, now St. Mary's Charity shop.

Black Bull
?   East side of Kirkgate opposite the Market Place close to junction with Bridge Street.
?   Part of Lord Londesborough's estate in the 1873 auction.
?   Closed before 1873.
?   Mentioned in Tadcaster auction schedule as a house, formerly Black Bull, but location is imprecise.


Offline bitterboy

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Re: Brewery and Tad pubs.
« Reply #5 on: Jul 22 - 2014 »
Great stuff,I can post what I know about the pubs on your list if useful,cheers BB.

Offline bitterboy

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Re: Brewery and Tad pubs.
« Reply #6 on: Jul 23 - 2014 »
As mentioned earlier,before Hartleys the brewery was owned by Beaumont,I found this entry from an old book,"in Thomas Beaumonts will in the 1720s he left 80 quarters of malt and lots of equipment - a business which ultimately led to the establishment of John Smiths",which suggests there was a brewery there in c1700 at least.


Offline Tadfan

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Re: Brewery and Tad pubs.
« Reply #7 on: Jul 23 - 2014 »
Update to the list:

The Queen: Has opened as a free house.
Jackdaw: Is due for demolition to make way for a housing.
Coach & Horse: Is a free house, owned by Stewart Lawton (Lawtons of Tadcaster)
White Swan: Owned by SSOB, closed for the last couple of years.
Calcaria: Has been shut for a couple of years, has just been sold & rumour is the bike shop has bought it to turn it into storage & a cyclist caf?.
Falcon: Now owned by SSOB.

Offline bitterboy

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Re: Brewery and Tad pubs.
« Reply #8 on: Jul 24 - 2014 »
Two nice pictures,first the original Leeds Arms and second the Travelling Man.

Offline bitterboy

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Re: Brewery and Tad pubs.
« Reply #9 on: Jul 24 - 2014 »
The Slip Inn is not mentioned in any directories but in the late 1700s the road was a toll road and the toll house was just west of the Slip.The cottages where the pub was/is are still known as Slip Inn cottages and the new estate across the road are named Turnpike rd and Toll Bar way.



Offline bitterboy

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Re: Brewery and Tad pubs.
« Reply #10 on: Jul 24 - 2014 »
Not looking good for the Jackdaw!.

Offline billious

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Re: Brewery and Tad pubs.
« Reply #11 on: Nov 16 - 2014 »
I hope you don't mind a blatant plug, but the Tadcaster Historical Society has published a small booklet written by Ian Page entitled "Tadcaster's Pubs". These can be purchased at various newsagents in Tadcaster. Or, if you don't live in Tadcaster, you can order a copy through the Tadcaster Historical Website : send a request to [email protected] .