Author Topic: Live Music Act 2012 and Sam Smith's Pubs  (Read 746 times)  Share 

Offline robdy2k

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Hello

As a villager whose one pub is Sam Smith's I have heard in the past the reason for the music policy was to save money on the license.

Given there should be no license required since the Live Music Act of 2012 ( great article about this here http://www.scilly.gov.uk/business-licensing/licensing/licensing-act-2003-alcohol-and-entertainment/live-recorded-music ) I wondered whether anyone had presented this to the owners to state the case for occasional community acoustic sessions?

We have a vibrant local community music scene and the pub is dying on its arse at the moment. There is no customers and no atmosphere. It's like a morgue. I have no doubt we could bring great revenue to the pub if we could take advantage of this legislation.

Has anyone anywhere tried to tackle this with any success?

Does anyone think an online petition might help?

Cheers
Rob

Offline east coast beer drinker

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Re: Live Music Act 2012 and Sam Smith's Pubs
« Reply #1 on: Dec 20 - 2016 »
Hello

As a villager whose one pub is Sam Smith's I have heard in the past the reason for the music policy was to save money on the license.

Given there should be no license required since the Live Music Act of 2012 ( great article about this here http://www.scilly.gov.uk/business-licensing/licensing/licensing-act-2003-alcohol-and-entertainment/live-recorded-music ) I wondered whether anyone had presented this to the owners to state the case for occasional community acoustic sessions?

We have a vibrant local community music scene and the pub is dying on its arse at the moment. There is no customers and no atmosphere. It's like a morgue. I have no doubt we could bring great revenue to the pub if we could take advantage of this legislation.

Has anyone anywhere tried to tackle this with any success?

Does anyone think an online petition might help?

Cheers
Rob

Not that I am aware of!

It's a very debatable question. I for one don't want music live or other wise or telly's in my local Sams pub. But there is plenty of choice around locally if that's what I want. However that's just my point of view.
Sam's brewery mission statement is by way of offering an alternative as most pubs have telly's and music of some sorts. They are "traditional" pubs and so to encourage chat and pub games. But if this isn't working at your local then perhaps it should be considered.

Good luck but don't hold your breath.   

Offline robdy2k

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Re: Live Music Act 2012 and Sam Smith's Pubs
« Reply #2 on: Dec 20 - 2016 »
Thanks. I'd have thought live acoustic singarounds would fit in with the traditional image if that's what they want as a business model?

Offline OnTheDrink

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Re: Live Music Act 2012 and Sam Smith's Pubs
« Reply #3 on: Dec 21 - 2016 »
Thanks. I'd have thought live acoustic singarounds would fit in with the traditional image if that's what they want as a business model?

They don't have a business model - the pubs are just what they are. Re licensing of live music, even though this isn't a regulated activity anymore, business premises that have any form of live or recorded performance still need a PRS for Music licence, which HS won't pay for.

Offline robdy2k

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Re: Live Music Act 2012 and Sam Smith's Pubs
« Reply #4 on: Dec 21 - 2016 »
Looking at www.ppluk.com it would seem that a PPL license could cost between £130 and £326 for a year in a pub. Sure we could do a fundraiser to cover that no bother. Would a community purchase be accepted do you think?

Offline OnTheDrink

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Re: Live Music Act 2012 and Sam Smith's Pubs
« Reply #5 on: Dec 21 - 2016 »
Looking at www.ppluk.com it would seem that a PPL license could cost between £130 and £326 for a year in a pub. Sure we could do a fundraiser to cover that no bother. Would a community purchase be accepted do you think?

It's not a PPL licence - that's for recorded music only - but I think you're missing the point - the company doesn't want music of any sort in their pubs, so no amount of fundraising or whatever would make a blind bit of difference. It's a shame because while some of the pubs are best left without music, others would certainly benefit from recorded or live music.

Offline east coast beer drinker

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Re: Live Music Act 2012 and Sam Smith's Pubs
« Reply #6 on: Dec 21 - 2016 »
From the brewery web site

The perfect pub

George Orwell described his perfect pub in a 1945 essay entitled “The Moon under Water” – Samuel Smith’s pubs accord with his ideal in several ways:

The architecture and fittings must be uncompromisingly Victorian
Games, such as darts, are only played in the public bar so that in other bars you can walk about without the worry of flying darts
The pub is quiet enough to talk, with the house possessing neither a radio nor a piano (we do not have music or TVs in our pubs)
The barmaids know the customers by name and take an interest in everyone
a creamy sort of draught stout
In winter there is generally a good fire burning in at least two of the bars

Offline Malchetone

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Re: Live Music Act 2012 and Sam Smith's Pubs
« Reply #7 on: Dec 21 - 2016 »
George Orwell named his perfect pub "The Moon under Water" because the moon under water is an illusion and doesn't actually exist; at least it didn't until Tim Martin came along and used the name for some of the early Wetherspoon pubs.